Side Eyes All Around

miss-love:

dontbaffletheboff:

miss-love:

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho
New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

Eddie Izzard has always been my favorite since I was young. I never thought about it, but his identity and way he dressed were never really part of the joke. Being feminine was not for laughs and he unabashedly was who he was and never apologized. I saw him perform live and he’s positively electric. He would walk on stage in full makeup and a sparkly dress and I think within five minutes of speaking he had a way of making every cis/heteronormative person stop seeing him as “atypical.” He always shut that down.In recent years I haven’t seen him expressing himself as much, and I worried he was trying to conceal his love of dressing feminine in order to be more successful in the acting field, but I’m really glad to see he’s back to the bright lipstick and fierce nails.He really did make being feminine a powerful thing and not just a punchline and he showed me a lot about gender expression and identity at a young age when I had never seen anything like it.

"They’re aren’t women’s clothes. They’re my clothes. I bought them." - Eddie Izzard

^great quote

miss-love:

dontbaffletheboff:

miss-love:

fullten:

popbonobuzzbaby:

Eddie Izzard - shopping at Mac store in Soho

New York City - May 14, 2014

When I was a kid I saw his HBO special. I watched it so many times I still know most of the words.  It was the first time I saw a man dressed feminine, be funny, and not have women as a punch line. He didn’t slump out in front of the stage embarrassed by his clothing, he came out perfectly happy, hoping around, and didn’t do some silly feminine voice for laughs, he just used his voice, he wore his clothes, spoke about social injustice, and he was fucking funny. It was nice to watch a comedian and not be the fucking punch line or a flattened stereotype for laughs. 

Eddie Izzard has always been my favorite since I was young. I never thought about it, but his identity and way he dressed were never really part of the joke. Being feminine was not for laughs and he unabashedly was who he was and never apologized. I saw him perform live and he’s positively electric.
He would walk on stage in full makeup and a sparkly dress and I think within five minutes of speaking he had a way of making every cis/heteronormative person stop seeing him as “atypical.” He always shut that down.

In recent years I haven’t seen him expressing himself as much, and I worried he was trying to conceal his love of dressing feminine in order to be more successful in the acting field, but I’m really glad to see he’s back to the bright lipstick and fierce nails.
He really did make being feminine a powerful thing and not just a punchline and he showed me a lot about gender expression and identity at a young age when I had never seen anything like it.

"They’re aren’t women’s clothes. They’re my clothes. I bought them." - Eddie Izzard

^great quote

(via intellectualruffian)

wickedclothes:

Glow In The Dark Green Uranium Glass Drinkwear

This glasswear set from the 1930s includes two tea / coffee cups, and two candy dishes. All of these pieces are crafted out of uranium glass, which glows a bright green color in the dark. Sold on Etsy.

Writing Tips #73: Top Ten Tips to Create a Character Arc

bookgeekconfessions:

Tips by Samantha Stone

Originally posted on creativewritingsoftware101.com

image


Just as in real life, characters on a page change and develop throughout your story. This is natural and should happen. You can write a story without any character development, but those types of stories are usually noted just for that reason – a character’s refusal or inability to learn or respond to the events around them.

Don’t let your character drift around in this developmental arc. Plan your character’s growth and reactions with events, interaction with other characters, and from inner turmoil or conflict. Often characters are at war with themselves or their beliefs, and this can affect their overall character change.

Use these 10 tips to keep your character arc on track for believable development.

1. Who Is the Character at the Beginning?

Decide who your character is and why they need to change. In the Christmas favorite A Christmas Carol, Scrooge changes from a cantankerous, heartless man into a caring and generous one. Think of Dr. Seuss’s Grinch.

2. Inner Demons

Secrets your character hides can be a driving force in who they are. Denial can keep your character falsely happy and guilt can haunt your character into madness. This was one of Shakespeare’s favorite devices.

3. Perception of Self

Your character’s self-image may be their worst enemy. Something your character sees as a fault may be exaggerated or may not exist at all. A character thinking they’re too fat, too ugly, stupid, or even superior to others are perceptions that can be changed or altered within the storyline. In the play and movie The Seven Year Itch, a pulp fiction editor sees himself as a skirt-chasing fiend trying to corner the blonde from upstairs – but he’s not. His fantasy life is exaggerated in his mind and has invaded when his wife and child are away for the summer.

4. Show the Character Changing

Give the reader the eyewitness view of the character changing. Show the obstacles overcome, the decisions made, the failures and wins. It doesn’t always have to be pretty.

Read More

(via gamesandthrones)

equaliteaandcrumpets:

persephoneholly:

Ahahaha. Here you go:


See how there’s no overlap? 

^ YES. And in case that didn’t get through to OP, I added my own edits:

equaliteaandcrumpets:

persephoneholly:

Ahahaha. Here you go:

See how there’s no overlap? 

^ YES. And in case that didn’t get through to OP, I added my own edits:

image

(via captaincrayonjuice)

whynotelsanna:

griddlemethis:

Pancake with all the colors of the wind.

i can’t even make a circular pancake what the fuck is this shit

whynotelsanna:

griddlemethis:

Pancake with all the colors of the wind.

i can’t even make a circular pancake what the fuck is this shit

(via captaincrayonjuice)

The Walking Dead meme: [11/20] characters

Glenn Rhee

(via the-walking-dead-amc)

→ Dragonball Z Abridged Episode 10 part 1

(Source: lovesgamesandanime, via vaneille)